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10,000-year-old underwater structures at Lake MacDonald point to a long-lost civilization

lake mcdonald underwater structure

The evidence of ancient civilizations was discovered beneath Lake MacDonald. Researchers have discovered 10,000-year-old underwater structures.

The discovery was made at a depth of 40 feet when divers were participating in a unique submarine project at the Haliburton Forest and Wild Life Reserve. Initially, researchers believed the oddly-shaped structures were a sophisticated version of a ‘perched erratic’ transported into place by glaciers thousands of years ago and dumped to their current position at the end of the last ice-age.

However, everything changed when divers examined the structure with more detail. Several scientists and geologists studied the rock assembly from proximity coming to the definite conclusion that the structures of seven gigantic monoliths were the result of human activity and not mother nature.

To understand how these structures got where they are today, experts did some math and turned to a statistician who calculated the odds of seven huge rocks falling on top of each other creating a perfect structure. The numbers didn’t lie, and the statistician reported that even four rocks forming a natural structure were almost unattainable, the odds of SEVEN rocks falling into position at the perfect time is something virtually impossible.

After scratching off their list the theory that this was a natural formation, researchers performed further studies finding looking for signs of the use of tools, decorative images or other signs of human intervention.

Researchers found that the layer of sediment that covered the surface indicates that no humans touched the structure for a very long time.

This finding raised numerous questions along the way. Who were these mysterious people? What happened to them? And how did they manage to quarry and transport these megalithic rocks and put them in position?

Many visitors to Haliburton Forest, who have seen images of the rock cairn have commented on it is balanced, almost attractive appearance. The surface of the top rock is almost perfectly level. Many have pointed out the many similarities between the MacDonald Lake stone structure and an arctic “inukshuk”.

Researchers have found evidence that Eastern parts of North America went through droughts of cataclysmic proportions sometime around 9000 and 7000 BC.

Experts point to the fact that in the distant past, arid conditions ruled the are and that water levels in the Great Lakes were around 50 meters lower. Researchers also discovered that inland lakes like Lake McDonald experienced a similar phenomenon.

One of the biggest questions that remain is why did ancient cultures inhabiting the region thousands of years ago erect a massive monument? How they did it remains another profound mystery.

Biologists concluded that Lake MacDonald is home to an ancient, glacial relic lake trout, which had survived some bouts of glaciation and retaining some of its unique features.

Experts also discovered that in the distant past, Lake Macdonald was not a lake but part of an ancient river system that for millennia funnelled glacial meltwater south into what was then mighty Lake Agassis.

While there is still much research that needs to be done, discoveries like this are the ultimate proof that tens of thousands of years ago, ancient cultures around the globe were far more advanced than what mainstream scholars today are willing to accept.

Perhaps this structure, together which other inexplicable features around the world are the ultimate evidence of a long lost era in the history of humankind.


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